The impact of COVID-19 on Trade Marks and other areas of Intellectual Property

As of the 24th March 2020, the UKIPO CEO has declared ‘interrupted days’, namely for the foreseeable future.

As a result this means that any trade marks filed after the 24th March 2020 are granted extensions. The breakdown of how this affects the trade mark filing procedure is noted below:

The examination procedure

To get in contact with an examiner if your trademark is in the examination/ hearing report process, then you need to contact only via email or the ‘reply’ button found on the examination page.

If you are applying for a trade mark now, your examination period will be automatically extended, under the UKIPO, for a further two months. Totalling your examination period to be 4 months.

Please note if you have applied for a design, an extension for replying to the report cannot be done however, further extensions are available if you contact the UKIPO for further information.

When your trade mark is accepted by the examination board they will publish this in the trade marks journal for any earlier trade marks to file for an opposition. This period may be extended as there may be a delay contacting owners of earlier marks. This is because this process at the moment is only done by post.

Please note, there will also be a delay in receiving any design and trade mark certificates. However, there is an option if you require this with a matter of urgency, you can contact the UKIPO for an email copy.

Nonetheless, the UKIPO will continue to run as normal despite the delays.

Here at the Trademarkroom, we are still running as normal to provide you with the best trade mark services. Please do not hesitate to contact us if you have any questions regarding your application process or, if you are looking to file a new trade mark.

Anna Orchard

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