Taylor Swift sued by Evermore theme park over album name

Taylor’s most recent album, named ‘Evermore’, has led U.S. based theme park, which carries the same name, to claim that the singer has infringed upon their trade mark. The theme park owners insisted that Swift’s album release has lead customers to confusion as to whether the two parties are linked.

Further, the company insists that there has been a “dramatic departure from typical levels” of interaction on their website, during the week in which the album was released. Swift’s legal team has opposed the latter by stating that although an inconvenience has occurred, no damages have been suffered by the claimant and that the album has in fact created a ‘marketing opportunity’ for the theme park to engage with.

The singer’s team has declined the demand to ‘cease and deists’ from the use of the Evermore trade mark. Nevertheless, the theme park owners are seeking millions of dollars in damages, adding that their trade mark was violated when Taylor began selling merchandise with her new album title. Be sure to look out for any further updates regarding this trade mark dispute, on our reading room.

If you have any queries regarding the above article or would require assistance with a trade mark, please do not hesitate to get in touch with a member of our Trademarkroom team today.

Tel: 02380 000190

E-mail: tmr@trademarkroom.com

Author- Lora Krasteva

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